Reading through these BMG mags I came across the ads from the 50s for the CE footrest.

That reminded me of a previous discussion where Ian posted he has one.  Begging him for photos, which he sent, I decided that a nice piece of Birdseye maple I have should be turned into one.

I have tried one of those metal folding footstools off and on but l never liked that they are angled.  They also have no class.

Here is the prototype.

I had to change a few things.  The CE was too high for my liking at 5.25” tall, I made mine 4.75” high. I also did not have lumber on hand that was wide enough (or thick enough) for the top so mine is narrower.  Finally, instead of trying to locate the flat spring steel for the bottom leaf spring, I used two compression coil springs and fabricated a small brass cover.

As someone who does not just make one of something, I made two more.

Chances are very high that I will not make anymore of these.  There is no way that I could sell these for what I need to and pay myself minimum wage.  Heck, the hardware cost me $30 US.

I will offer the prototype and one of the others for sale and will have them at the ABF rally at the end of this month.  If there is no interest at the rally I will put them for sale online.

if you ever wanted a super cool footstool for banjo playing that is way overbuilt and classier than the junky metal ones, come to the ABF rally and get one.

I am extremely pleased with the design.  I also know fully well that these would be priced out of the market.  

Did I mention they are made of Birdseye maple?  Perfect to go with a FVE banjo (or any banjo).

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Perhaps I should have one for each foot???

...and they would match my Weaver

:-)

Ian, you need one for each banjo.  Please send me each banjo you would like matched.  I will build a stool to match and then send the stools to you.

WOW!! Nice Weaver!!!  I love me some birdseye!! 

That banjo looks delicious. 

WOW, these are gorgeous. I would happily buy one today. And the height is lower than the lowest setting on my metal one, which makes it just right for me. But not for banjo. I would use it for oud. If there's no interest at the rally please let me know.   For me the banjo on the right thigh with both feet on the floor is perfect, just like pictured in the old tutor books. 

I guess the idea of the angled footstool  is that if it slopes toward the player it keeps the instrument from tumbling forward. Used the other way it feels awful.

Thanks Jody. I was please with how they turned out.  This was the first project that I drew all the parts to scale in Autodesk Graphic (an illustration software) and used it to plan construction. It took away the trial and error.  All the parts were the right size the first time.

I caught myself using two positions. With banjo on right thigh I raise my heel and lean it against the chair leg this raises the banjo up.  The second position that I use is to cross my left leg over my right and set the banjo on my right thigh and against the side of my left thigh-- it is this position that I use the most as I can let go if the banjo and it stays where it is.

Using the stool under my left foot I can play in that position without crossing my legs which is more comfortable.

I would have to sell these for just north of $100 to make it worth my time.  With sanding, the 5 coats of shellac, hand fitting all the parts, and the cost of the hardware, (those brass slotted head screws are expensive and becoming difficult to find) they are not cheap to build. 

I don't see how banjo builders make any money.

I was going to put $90 on the prototype (the hinge is a little lighter but still solid brass) and $100 on the other (I was able to source a heavier hinge but it cost more).

Even at those prices It is not really worth the effort to make more.  I don't think I could get more for them considering the metal ones are $10.

Speaking of price, how does one read the prices in these BMGs?  Is that 35 pounds?  Schillings? I am presuming that is shillings.

Yes, 35 shillings. 

These look great, and I'd love to have one of yours, Jody, but 100$ plus shipping and import taxes means it will remain a wish. But good luck with the sales!

Yes it's priced in shillings, 240 pence made one pound, £1.00 or 20 shillings. When translating old money prices into modern values I often use the price of beer per pint, then and now, so for instance a pint of beer c1970 was around 2/-, two shillings, if the footstool had been for sale for 35 shillings or £1/15 shillings in 1970 that would equate to 17.5 pints of beer, which at todays prices (beer is now around £4.00 a pint), that would be £70.00, Beer in the mid 1950s would have been around 1/3 or 15 pence a pint, so 35 shillings would have bought you 28 pints putting a value of about £112.00 on the stool.

Joel Hooks said:

Thanks Jody. I was please with how they turned out.  This was the first project that I drew all the parts to scale in Autodesk Graphic (an illustration software) and used it to plan construction. It took away the trial and error.  All the parts were the right size the first time.

I caught myself using two positions. With banjo on right thigh I raise my heel and lean it against the chair leg this raises the banjo up.  The second position that I use is to cross my left leg over my right and set the banjo on my right thigh and against the side of my left thigh-- it is this position that I use the most as I can let go if the banjo and it stays where it is.

Using the stool under my left foot I can play in that position without crossing my legs which is more comfortable.

I would have to sell these for just north of $100 to make it worth my time.  With sanding, the 5 coats of shellac, hand fitting all the parts, and the cost of the hardware, (those brass slotted head screws are expensive and becoming difficult to find) they are not cheap to build. 

I don't see how banjo builders make any money.

I was going to put $90 on the prototype (the hinge is a little lighter but still solid brass) and $100 on the other (I was able to source a heavier hinge but it cost more).

Even at those prices It is not really worth the effort to make more.  I don't think I could get more for them considering the metal ones are $10.

Speaking of price, how does one read the prices in these BMGs?  Is that 35 pounds?  Schillings? I am presuming that is shillings.

Thanks Richard, funny, $125 US is where I would need to be to consider producing these.  In my opinion that is high for a footstool (no matter how cool it is).

That price would leave no room to wholesale them (meaning I could not sell them to Elderly or the like) and I would have to direct sale them.

BUT... I wanted one and I am glad I made them.



Richard William Ineson said:

Yes it's priced in shillings, 240 pence made one pound, £1.00 or 20 shillings. When translating old money prices into modern values I often use the price of beer per pint, then and now, so for instance a pint of beer c1970 was around 2/-, two shillings, if the footstool had been for sale for 35 shillings or £1/15 shillings in 1970 that would equate to 17.5 pints of beer, which at todays prices (beer is now around £4.00 a pint), that would be £70.00, Beer in the mid 1950s would have been around 1/3 or 15 pence a pint, so 35 shillings would have bought you 28 pints putting a value of about £112.00 on the stool.

Joel Hooks said:

Thanks Jody. I was please with how they turned out.  This was the first project that I drew all the parts to scale in Autodesk Graphic (an illustration software) and used it to plan construction. It took away the trial and error.  All the parts were the right size the first time.

I caught myself using two positions. With banjo on right thigh I raise my heel and lean it against the chair leg this raises the banjo up.  The second position that I use is to cross my left leg over my right and set the banjo on my right thigh and against the side of my left thigh-- it is this position that I use the most as I can let go if the banjo and it stays where it is.

Using the stool under my left foot I can play in that position without crossing my legs which is more comfortable.

I would have to sell these for just north of $100 to make it worth my time.  With sanding, the 5 coats of shellac, hand fitting all the parts, and the cost of the hardware, (those brass slotted head screws are expensive and becoming difficult to find) they are not cheap to build. 

I don't see how banjo builders make any money.

I was going to put $90 on the prototype (the hinge is a little lighter but still solid brass) and $100 on the other (I was able to source a heavier hinge but it cost more).

Even at those prices It is not really worth the effort to make more.  I don't think I could get more for them considering the metal ones are $10.

Speaking of price, how does one read the prices in these BMGs?  Is that 35 pounds?  Schillings? I am presuming that is shillings.

Thinks for the kind words Rob.  Yep, it is expensive for a footstool.

Rob MacKillop said:

Yes, 35 shillings. 

These look great, and I'd love to have one of yours, Jody, but 100$ plus shipping and import taxes means it will remain a wish. But good luck with the sales!

Joel, you've made a fine job of reproducing the foot stools and you will have no trouble in selling them. People value craftsmanship and fine materials these days and $125 is not a bad price for the best on the market. Of course you could send the plans to China and see how much they will make them for. I would buy one but I've got another type of wooden footstool which has sentimental value I'll send you a photo of it .

Thanks again Richard.  I am starting to think that after the rally I just might make up a dozen of them and see what happens.

At this point in time China might cost more!  But I'd rather not get into politics here.

I would love to see your stool.

Richard William Ineson said:

Joel, you've made a fine job of reproducing the foot stools and you will have no trouble in selling them. People value craftsmanship and fine materials these days and $125 is not a bad price for the best on the market. Of course you could send the plans to China and see how much they will make them for. I would buy one but I've got another type of wooden footstool which has sentimental value I'll send you a photo of it .

Oh dear. That does not translate well into UK English...

Joel Hooks said:

I would love to see your stool.

LOL. Same 'issue' with USA English... ;-)

My hovercraft is full of eels!

Yes, I would think $125 is cheap for that much birdseye maple. I could cut the stool into veneers and make money! (ok, probably not)

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