National Self Teacher for Banjo (With Finger Board Chart).

Dear Classic Banjo Friends,

I present to the interested public yet another banjo instruction book, the "National Self Teacher for Banjo" by Will D. Moyer.  1919 and 1924 are the dates on it.

While it is a below average instruction book, there is one point of interest.  It states that "strings may be either wire or gut- may be played with finger or pick."  The "wire" strings are likely for pick playing, but 1919 does follow the timeline when we start to see people using steel strings for regular banjo (Weidt being one of those).

Also interesting is that it is in A notation, stating that "the market is full of pieces published for this notation it is well worth the efforts of any banjo lover to master this style."

Some of you may enjoy "Green Corn" under the title of "Favorite Jig."  Some nice variations to add to that ever-present piece. 

Unlock history by learning to read in A notation!

https://archive.org/details/national-self-teacher-for-banjo-will-d-...

(As always, this is public domain. Feel free to use your property how you see fit.  Play the music, print copies and sell them at your newsstand, sell digital downloads to suckers on etsy and ebay, Photoshop your name on the cover and pretend that you wrote it, add a new introduction and pretend that entitles you to a new copyright, or ignore it entirely... IDK)

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OMG, it has "Lightly Row" just above "Favorite Jig" too. This is another ubiquitous teaching tune...which I learned at the tender age of 9 on the piano. The method I used was John Schaum's, ca. 1950s...and the tune was called "Tuna Fish" (complete with lyrics "Tuna fish, tuna fish, its my favorite dish!"). This little ditty has followed me throughout my life, appearing in a variety of tutors...including when I started learning the Cello and then Viola (only Schaum called it 'Tuna Fish' though).

My viola instructor perked up and commented (after playing that tune) that my sight reading was quite good for only my second teaching session. I laughed and admitted to playing it by ear...I think the intervals are engraved somewhere in my brain, I could play it on anything that makes noise.

I claim copyright as being the original author!  You can send me $100 donation or download it free from the MUSIC LIBRARY..  your choice :-)

"like"

thereallyniceman said:

I claim copyright as being the original author!  You can send me $100 donation or download it free from the MUSIC LIBRARY..  your choice :-)

... and this appears to be an extremely rare unsigned copy of my work, so is probably worth much more ;-)

I just want to thank the author, Ian, for including a fingerboard chart without any flats. I hate those things. 

thereallyniceman said:

... and this appears to be an extremely rare unsigned copy of my work, so is probably worth much more ;-)

The Finger Board Chart is one of the most important selling features of this book.  I can't think of a single "banjo tutor" published before this one to feature such a chart. ;-)

I don't know about y'all, but I cut a piece of plywood and glue the full-size charts to it. I install clips so that I can clip it to my music stand as a quick reference. I have one in every banjo case.

I usually put a round part on one end so I can tell which end of the board is which. That also makes it double as a fine flyswatter.

If you use paper-clamps, move one to the end of the board and you have a great back scratcher!

;-)

I keep two plywood charts in each case, one for A notation, and one for C.  I keep a stack of charts by the back door for emergency and self defense. 

This chart is from one of Sheard's albums, I've never seen another which attributes the chart to a particular banjo, it goes right up to the 22nd fret but my scanner isn't big enough to cover it all.

Cool!  If you scan it in two halves I can assemble them together.

The Morley tutor chart clearly depicts a "Peerless" Concert Ordinary by John Alvey Turner. Complete with professional pattern tailpiece, correct inlay and a "Turner" marked bridge.  As if the cover photo, photos of Morley demonstrating positions, and back page ad were not enough to try and convince you to buy one.

 

Has anyone played a "Peerless"?  Are they any good.  I figure Morley was paid to hold it, or it was part of the deal.

You guys, I just *love* these minute details.  Keep em coming!  Great stuff!

Joel Hooks said:

Cool!  If you scan it in two halves I can assemble them together.

The Morley tutor chart clearly depicts a "Peerless" Concert Ordinary by John Alvey Turner. Complete with professional pattern tailpiece, correct inlay and a "Turner" marked bridge.  As if the cover photo, photos of Morley demonstrating positions, and back page ad were not enough to try and convince you to buy one.

 

Has anyone played a "Peerless"?  Are they any good.  I figure Morley was paid to hold it, or it was part of the deal.

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