I'm writing a readable transcript of this Morley arrangement, I don't recognise the opening tune, does anyone know if it has a title or is something Morley wrote himself...many thanks, Steve.

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What is wrong with the score in the MUSIC LIBRARY, it looks clear enough to me?

I can't name the opening either, but used to play it and did lessons on it !!

The score in the Music Library shows a title for each section except the opening one. This suggests to me that it was composed by Morley. The melody and fingering is typical of Joe Morley so this seems a reasonable working hypothesis. I don't see what needs to become more readable. Perhaps a few of the bars are a bit cramped as they are full of sharp signs and fingering indications but that is typical of printed music of the era and presents no obstacle to reading especially as the original printed music sheets were large. The only puzzle to me is the symbol "Ex" which appears occasionally.  I don't know what it means but I can read it clearly. There are anomalies as well. Page 2 and 4 are each shown in upper right corner as page 3 whereas the actual third page has no number at all. Perhaps page one of the first and second banjo parts were title pages. That would explain it. 

The method of notation used in most old, UK published, banjo scores is by using fret number positions where the 1st finger rests, and a numbered chord "shape". In this EX chord  (shown on the 5th stave of the first page) there is a 7P 412 shape but with the fourth finger moved or extended from the B to the C.

i.e. 4th finger on the C, 1st on the Fsharp, 2nd on the Dsharp   ... is that a B7th chord ?  denoted as  7P 412Ex.

   The 4th finger is slid back to the B for the next chord, Bmaj, which is a 7P 412.

Chord-Shapes-PDF.pdf

I see. Ex stands for extended?  It's a diminished chord.  Three of the 4 notes of a diminished chord actually. We can call it a C diminished or F sharp diminished or D sharp diminished. We can even call it an E flat diminished even though that note is not being played. I would call it a C diminished. A diminished chord cuts the octave into equal thirds. There is an interval of 3 half steps between each of its notes.

thereallyniceman said:

The method of notation used in most old, UK published, banjo scores is by using fret number positions where the 1st finger rests, and a numbered chord "shape". In this EX chord  (shown on the 5th stave of the first page) there is a 7P 412 shape but with the fourth finger moved or extended from the B to the C.

i.e. 4th finger on the C, 1st on the Fsharp, 2nd on the Dsharp   ... is that a B7th chord ?  denoted as  7P 412Ex.

   The 4th finger in slid back to the B for the next chord, Bmaj, which is a 7P 412.

Chord-Shapes-PDF.pdf

Thanks Jody...  C diminished     sounds good :-)

Hi Ian, I'm rescoring all my favourite tunes into a larger format to make them easier to read not only for me but for teaching purposes. I've changed the lay out so that breaks or endings are placed at the end of each line of music...Steve. 
thereallyniceman said:

What is wrong with the score in the MUSIC LIBRARY, it looks clear enough to me?

I can't name the opening either, but used to play it and did lessons on it !!

Yes, what Ian wrote.

Here is the explanation by Grimshaw "Extended Chords"

https://archive.org/details/the-banjo-and-how-to-play-it-emile-grim...

Thanks. I just didn't know what "Ex" stood for. The thing itself I understand already.

Joel Hooks said:

Yes, what Ian wrote.

Here is the explanation by Grimshaw "Extended Chords"

https://archive.org/details/the-banjo-and-how-to-play-it-emile-grim...

Whoops I misspoke. I meant we can even call it an "A diminished" even though the A Natural is not being sounded.

Jody Stecher said:

I see. Ex stands for extended?  It's a diminished chord.  Three of the 4 notes of a diminished chord actually. We can call it a C diminished or F sharp diminished or D sharp diminished. We can even call it an E flat diminished even though that note is not being played. I would call it a C diminished. A diminished chord cuts the octave into equal thirds. There is an interval of 3 half steps between each of its notes.

thereallyniceman said:

The method of notation used in most old, UK published, banjo scores is by using fret number positions where the 1st finger rests, and a numbered chord "shape". In this EX chord  (shown on the 5th stave of the first page) there is a 7P 412 shape but with the fourth finger moved or extended from the B to the C.

i.e. 4th finger on the C, 1st on the Fsharp, 2nd on the Dsharp   ... is that a B7th chord ?  denoted as  7P 412Ex.

   The 4th finger in slid back to the B for the next chord, Bmaj, which is a 7P 412.

Chord-Shapes-PDF.pdf

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