Some time ago site member Rev. Anthony Peabody and I discussed the possibility of creating a special section on the website to enable members and site visitors to share the work that he has been doing in creating audio files from early Joe Morley scores.

 

The Cammeyer Music and Manufacturing Company, a partnership between Alfred Cammeyer and Clifford Essex, published many of these scores 1893 to c1900. Most of these early pieces were arranged for a duet of banjos and some seem not to have had piano accompaniments available. They were published in the Cammeyer series of “Banjo Albums”, but I believe that individual tunes and parts could be ordered from the publishers.

Anthony is one of the very few Bass banjo players around and has added a bass banjo part to these audio tracks. This addition really brings the scores to life!  The audio recordings were produced midi format and the sampling of “General Midi” banjo is diabolical, sounding like a Dalek on helium, so I have re-edited them, as best as I can, using guitar and piano GM files.

 

Richard Ineson has done extensive research into the dating of Morley’s compositions and his work can be found on the Joe Morley website:    Joe Morley website

 

Most of the works are un-dated so the order of listing of the scores are in “approximate” date of publishing only and may be re-ordered if necessary over time.

 

I have been working on creating a database and page to allow visitors to download the Morley scores and play the audio file while they view the sheet music score!

I hope that you are inspired to have a go at playing some of these long lost gems!

VIEW THE SCORES AND PLAY THE MUSIC

 

I intend to expand this project to include as many of Morley’s later compositions as I can... but it may take a while, as there are approximately 250!

 

ENJOY

 

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GREAT   IDEA  , Ian & Anthony  ;             and Joe

 I read your original post too carelessly. You wrote that that Anthony has added bass parts to the *audio* tracks. I misunderstood that to mean he had added bass parts to the written scores. So I was looking for them and couldn't find them. My problem, not your or his. I misunderstood. Too many calluses on my brain.

thereallyniceman said:

I shall leave the arrangement details to Anthony, but I believe that he is busy for a couple of weeks. The main point is to let people hear these lost tunes and choose whether they wish to attempt to play them. I cannot guarantee 100% adherence to the printed scores, but they are darned close!

I don't think that he wants to publish his bass arrangements, but I will leave that to him to decide.

I have a couple of favourites  "Celebrated Grafton Parade" is amazing as is "Varsity Polka"

Amazing job, Ian and Anthony! I just popped down to check the site and was blown away. Your work on this site never fails to impress, and this is an invaluable resource for all lovers of Morley's music. The arrangements are a great way to catch a glimpse at the tunes and how they sound in an ensemble setting!

Thank you Ian and Anthony.  What a great resource.  I find hearing a piece is really helpful when I am trying to transcribe from music notation so thanks very much.  I must say I really like the sound of those minor key pieces like Arizona Jig.  The first part of 'Heel and Toe Polka' has elements of 'Blackberry Blossom' about it - I'm really enjoying listening to these pieces and making a 'to learn' list!



Jody Stecher said:

 I read your original post too carelessly. You wrote that that Anthony has added bass parts to the *audio* tracks. I misunderstood that to mean he had added bass parts to the written scores. So I was looking for them and couldn't find them. My problem, not your or his. I misunderstood. Too many calluses on my brain.

thereallyniceman said:

I shall leave the arrangement details to Anthony, but I believe that he is busy for a couple of weeks. The main point is to let people hear these lost tunes and choose whether they wish to attempt to play them. I cannot guarantee 100% adherence to the printed scores, but they are darned close!

I don't think that he wants to publish his bass arrangements, but I will leave that to him to decide.

I have a couple of favourites  "Celebrated Grafton Parade" is amazing as is "Varsity Polka"

Again, marvelous addition here. Kudos.

I had not intended to put the bass parts up for inspection, as they are only fairly simple accompaniments, and not especially useful as there are so few bass banjoists about.  They are not to be compared with the few original bass parts bearing Joe's name, and which tend to be much more elaborate and complicated, but then I am no Joe Morley.

I could probably supply them, but  as they are made electronically, transfer would have to be by surface mail, and I ask myself is it really what you want?  They are there with 1st and 2nd banjo just to provide a bit of "bottom" and support, which is what we bass banjoists do.

I think I'm being dense here; I see the PDFs and the JPGs, but I see no audio files?  

Ahhhh Andy,

Click the View icon, see the sheet music...beneath the Score there is a player...click the play button.

(Depending on your screen resolution you may have to cursor down a little but most people don't have to)

Let e know if you still have trouble and I will look into it..works fine here!!

For the benefit of Andy,

Here is an earlier reply illustrating what you are looking for!

Under the scores there is a player:

The files are NOT downloadable, but playable

I just received email notification of the presence of the Joe Morley bio and works on this site.  Very nicely done project, thank you for putting it all out here.  It's very nice to be able to read about and play the works of such foundational people in the banjo world.

-- Don Hergert

Loma Linda, California.

Well. after ALL that work I received an email from Anthony letting me know that his Master of Arts Thesis is now published!

Here is a copy of his message:

Dear all,

I am pleased to be able to tell you that the Morley project has reached fruition, and the whole thing is now published in the form of a MA thesis from Huddersfield University.

It is called “Joe Morley, banjo player, his life, works, and his music”, and although it is a thesis, it is accessible, readable,  full of interesting facts and data rich.  Although it cannot be the final word, it is probably as far as we can get at this time.

Much as I would like to give everyone a free copy, as this has already cost me upwards of £5K, I can’t.

However, as I know that all banjoists like a bargain, especially if it is FREE then you can download a copy for nothing at:

 

In the search box that is offered, just type in either Peabody or Morley, and it will come up.  Yours to download.

I do have 4 hard copies which I had printed off for those who would like a hard copy, but as the printing costa came out of the housekeeping, I will have to charge at cost, which is £25.00 (still a snip).

 

I am very keen that the information is made widely available, and as long as the usual acknowledgements are made (Peabody, 2018), then feel free.

I hope you can find time to read at least those bits which interest you, as Joe’s life has yielded up at least some of its secrets.

For instance: Joe’s Paternal grandmother was a Roma lady, which might begin to explain Joe’s father George Morley’s nomadic existence.

 

Thank you

 

Anthony peabody

 

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