Today I have added a new JOURNALS AND ALBUMS page to our site.

I hope to expand this over time to include all my, and hopefully other people's, Banjo Journals and old Music Album scans. So far I have some really old "Banjo World" and "Keynotes" Journals and a few other interesting downloads.  I have many more to add but after scanning over 500 BMG Magazines  I am a little scanned out at the moment and my trusty A3 scanner and I need to cool down for a while.

Many of the old journals have, over the years, lost their music supplements, but most music is available in the site MUSIC LIBRARY.

I have a pile of Turner Banjo Albums and the promise of other journals, so watch this space as you won't find them anywhere else! 

The William Temlett,  "The Banjo" Booklet is VERY rare and little NON PC.. so beware, but worth a read. 

A big thank you to Richard Ineson for searching through, and loaning, part of his archive for this project.

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I have a pile of Turner's also. I sent them to Hal Allert (RIP) years ago and he had them posted them to his website. Once I get settled after retiring, I'll dig them out and list what I have. I think Joel got some to scan too...I don't know if he has posted them to the Internet Archive or not.

The internet at its best. Well done.

Hmm, I see nothing on the Journals and Albums page. Am I missing something, or did you just reserve the space for future uploads?

You're missing something. I just downloaded the Turner March Collection and the Temlett.

Amazed at the perception from Temlett. His history of the banjo is very good and very much follows the outline of modern research.

===Marc

Rob MacKillop said:

Hmm, I see nothing on the Journals and Albums page. Am I missing something, or did you just reserve the space for future uploads?

How strange. I've tried on my Kindle Fire and on my iMac, and in both instances all I get is this:

On an iMac using Safari the new page has no content except an announcement that Ian is working on the page.  On the same computer using Firefox as a web browser I see plenty of content and it's all download-able.

Rob MacKillop said:

How strange. I've tried on my Kindle Fire and on my iMac, and in both instances all I get is this:

Sigh. Will it be available on non-Firefox browsers?

Temlett is a bit confused about Indian origins.  The Ravanastron, generally called Ravanahatha is certainly skin covered and the sound box can be round. But it is a bowed instrument.  I think "ban joy" (make massa joyful, yessuh, dat's wot we wanna do) is pure fantasy. On page 8 he states that a banjo hoop must be at least 12 inches in diameter. Interesting! Then on page 9 we see that Rogers banjo heads were in existence way back then. But somehow the final S wasn't there.   According to Temlett it's a Roger head.   Whoops gotta go....it's almost 11.

Trapdoor2 said:

Amazed at the perception from Temlett. His history of the banjo is very good and very much follows the outline of modern research.

===Marc

It works fine here on Firefox, Safari and Chrome.

Maybe you could re-start your browser or clear browser cache.. Go to the page and press CMD- R or CMD-Shift-R on a Mac and it should work as everything is there!  Those who can't see it may have a version in their cache from earlier today before I uploaded all the content. Clearing browser cache should fix it.

Thanks, Ian. It works now. Enjoying Banjo World :-)

Hey, if it has a string, a stick and a skin...it be a banjo precursor. Somebody left their bow home and had to play the concert pizzicato!

Even he acknowledges that the "Ban Joy" thing is simply fantasy. He puts the banjos origins in the murky past, attributes it to the most ancient culture he knew and allows for migration to Senegambia, evolution, etc. I'd say that's pretty close to what we believe today. I give him an A+ for 1888. Heck, that story would have been heresy in 1968.

Jody Stecher said:

Temlett is a bit confused about Indian origins.  The Ravanastron, generally called Ravanahatha is certainly skin covered and the sound box can be round. But it is a bowed instrument.  I think "ban joy" (make massa joyful, yessuh, dat's wot we wanna do) is pure fantasy. On page 8 he states that a banjo hoop must be at least 12 inches in diameter. Interesting! Then on page 9 we see that Rogers banjo heads were in existence way back then. But somehow the final S wasn't there.   According to Temlett it's a Roger head.   Whoops gotta go....it's almost 11.

Trapdoor2 said:

Amazed at the perception from Temlett. His history of the banjo is very good and very much follows the outline of modern research.

===Marc

I misread "pizzicato" as pizza-gato and it reminded me of when a buddy of mine was working night shift at a veterinary clinic in central Oregon.  He got hungry and ordered a pizza, which arrived in due course. He paid the delivery guy who left the clinic and drove off.   About 10 minutes later the same vehicle rolled up and out came the same pizza delivery boy and he was carrying a pizza box.  What the?  The vet opened the door and the poor fellow explained that the back country road was very dark and he wasn't able to avoid running over a cat.  He carried the cat in an empty pizza box.  Since this was a vet clinic maybe something could be done. But the poor thing had been totally flattened and nothing could be done except lethal injection to end the pain. The vet told me : I looked inside the box and what it contained was literally a Cat Pizza.  My first thought was "But I ordered the Supreme!" 

Way off topic I know.  Well maybe not. A pizza is round and so is a banjo head. The cat tail could be the banjo neck. 

Or maybe not.

Trapdoor2 said:

Hey, if it has a string, a stick and a skin...it be a banjo precursor. Somebody left their bow home and had to play the concert pizzicato!

Even he acknowledges that the "Ban Joy" thing is simply fantasy. He puts the banjos origins in the murky past, attributes it to the most ancient culture he knew and allows for migration to Senegambia, evolution, etc. I'd say that's pretty close to what we believe today. I give him an A+ for 1888. Heck, that story would have been heresy in 1968.

Jody Stecher said:

Temlett is a bit confused about Indian origins.  The Ravanastron, generally called Ravanahatha is certainly skin covered and the sound box can be round. But it is a bowed instrument.  I think "ban joy" (make massa joyful, yessuh, dat's wot we wanna do) is pure fantasy. On page 8 he states that a banjo hoop must be at least 12 inches in diameter. Interesting! Then on page 9 we see that Rogers banjo heads were in existence way back then. But somehow the final S wasn't there.   According to Temlett it's a Roger head.   Whoops gotta go....it's almost 11.

Trapdoor2 said:

Amazed at the perception from Temlett. His history of the banjo is very good and very much follows the outline of modern research.

===Marc

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