Whoa Ho, Ginny! It's a Patent model in great condition. And bound in metal for the tropical colonies, like my JE Dallas. This is the first Patent I've seen that is not falling to pieces. You are very lucky, this is a great banjo and has the potential to be a great sounding banjo. The bad news is a small matter that is very easy to fix. That is an unsuitable bridge for this banjo. Anything at all is likely to sound better. This kind of bridge —when it has feet— can be very good for tenor banjo but you'd be better off with a string bean or a pencil then the bridge you've got now. Also it looks like the head might need a bit of tightening. The stains (rust? tea?) won't hurt the sound and can probably be removed with delicate applications of alcohol and determination. Congratulations! this is a great banjo.

Views: 434

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Thanks for your comments about the banjo.  Yes, the Cammeyer does seem to be in very good condition.  The luthier we took it to put that bridge on it, and we had no idea about preferred bridges at the time.  As you said, this should be an easy fix.  I'll try the alcohol cleaning method on the head.  It does look like rust or tea.   I don't know.  It's been sitting in its case in the rafters since 1975, so who knows what or when the stains came from.

I will get busy pretty soon with it again, but I must confess I'm still working on my new Recording King with clawhammer old time tunes, too, and the fiddle.  Too many tunes, too little time! argh!

Today, I looked at Ian's "Whistling Ruffus" video, and got inspired about that, again.  I am drawn to that one, and fiddlers do like it, too, as Ian mentioned.

I, finally, got the leader of our little play-out band up here in the Seattle area, to let me have the lead on the banjo (clawhammer so far) before the guitars and fiddlers join in on two of the tunes we have had on our tune list for performances at senior centers and assisted living facilities.  I figure that if the person with the whistle and flute (argh), and the autoharpist can have the lead, so can I, with the banjo!  I sure would like to play a tune from the Classic Banjo web site list.  Duncan and I were working on the Sunflower Dance some time ago, but I haven't continued with practicing it, lately. I wonder if I go to "Upload Files" if I can attach a picture?  Here I go.  Im going to see what happens.  OK, now I see how that works, but I am not ready to send the photo yet.  Later.  Thanks, Jody.

By all means learn Whistling Rufus but don't be surprised when the fiddlers want to play it in G, the usual fiddle key for this tune. The banjo version is in C.

Your bridge looks like it had an operation and has had its legs cut off. Is that really so? Even with legs, the kind of bridge with plastic or bone inserts under each string is not likely to bring out the best zither-banjo sound. 

Ref the vellum cleaning, my banjo teacher 'Horace Craddy' mentioned to me once to try using white bread, it did work, but I suppose it depends what caused the stains.  This could be construed as using ones loaf.

 

The buttered side or the plain side?

Mike Redman said:

Ref the vellum cleaning, my banjo teacher 'Horace Craddy' mentioned to me once to try using white bread, it did work, but I suppose it depends what caused the stains.  This could be construed as using ones loaf.

 

I would say you may need to use the 'upper crust' for a Cammeyer banjo.



Jody Stecher said:

The buttered side or the plain side?

Mike Redman said:

Ref the vellum cleaning, my banjo teacher 'Horace Craddy' mentioned to me once to try using white bread, it did work, but I suppose it depends what caused the stains.  This could be construed as using ones loaf.

 

Ginny,

You mentioned that you wish to play Whistling Rufus on your new "super" Cammeyer!

I have the TAB for the first section that is shown in my tutorial video.

Perhaps you could check out the Clifford Essex Music website as they may have a Notation and TAB score, or maybe someone on here will be able to provide a copy of the TAB. I don't use TAB so can't help I am afraid.

DOWNLOAD TAB

Attachments:

Hello, Ian.

Thanks for your reply. My note-reading and trying to play at the same time and watch your magical hands is a little beyond me.  I did print out the sheet music from the library, and maybe I can place your dots on that and proceed.  I need to learn the notes better than I have them now, so I have alot to work on. No appologies from you!  I sure appreciate what you have done educating everyone about classic banjo.  I've never experienced so many helpful folks in interests I have had, previously.  It is a wonderful thing you have going on here!

Yes, I should really use the "upper crust,"  although I try to stay away from white bread.  I thought the stains added alot of character to the Cammeyer, but I may try a teeny bit of alcohol to see what happens.

Mike Redman said:

I would say you may need to use the 'upper crust' for a Cammeyer banjo.



Jody Stecher said:

The buttered side or the plain side?

Mike Redman said:

Ref the vellum cleaning, my banjo teacher 'Horace Craddy' mentioned to me once to try using white bread, it did work, but I suppose it depends what caused the stains.  This could be construed as using ones loaf.

 

I wouldn't touch the stains if it was my banjo. I've restored 9 vintage banjos over the years and I always do the minimum amount of work to get the banjo into playable condition. I take the view that all the scratches and knocks etc. are part of the banjo's history. I've seen quite a few that have been restored to within an inch of their lives and they looked as if they'd just left the shop for the first time.

Scratches and knocks are the equivalent of battle scars or mementos of playground injuries to be at least accepted and maybe proudly displayed. Stains on the vellum from spillage are like soup stains on one's shirt. If you spill tomato sauce or custard on your pants I think it's better to clean it off or change your trousers. Stains on the vellum from living organisms like mold or mildew are a potential health hazard. The light application of alcohol does not harm the vellum and sometimes it'll tighten an old floppy vellum and give it new life. 

This banjo appears to be in pristine condition. It has been well-treated. If it were banged up, then the stained vellum might well be harmonious with the whole. But this banjo appears in the photos to have "just left the shop for the first time". This is not a bad thing at all in my opinion.

Off the Classic banjo track a little as I had some clawhammer tunes I committed to, playing with some fiddle groups.  Soon I hope to get back to it.  The Cammeyer has been neglected too long.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2021   Created by thereallyniceman.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service