There's a Clifford Essex Professional on UK ebay with no bids. Needs some cleanup but might be alright. But what's the deal with the screw in the  heel? Is that what's always under the usual dot? Looks horrible.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=120751139407...

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Yes ; always ; the screw is under the dot or under  the elaborate inlay ; when there is no inlay ,you have to de_glue the ebony heel plate to remove the screw if you want take off the  broken dowel S for instance
Yes, I presume it holds the perch pole in place - a pearl to cover that is no big deal. The ebony wedges are in very eccentric positions. Why does the seller think it needs new tuners? 
Because he doesn't read music?

David Wade said:
 Why does the seller think it needs new tuners? 

These CE 'Professional' banjos have always been a bit of a mystery to me, I don't think that they were made by Weaver - he didn't make banjos for anybody else after 1906. These banjos have some of his characteristics such as the very large nuts, inside the hoop, which hold the bracket shoes on, but the heel shape is always wrong and the spliced neck is not a Weaver thing, and the screw, presumable fixing the perch pole in the heel is definitely not Weaver; all the banjos made by him which I have seen, had one piece, perch pole/neck construction.

 

Weaver did make a lot of the early CE 'Special' banjos, and these are indistinguishable from the banjos made under his own name.

 

The 'Professional' hoops are generally pretty deep and impart a very booming, and to my mind 'tubby' sound to the instrument.

 

I wonder who did make them?

Hmmmmm. I don't suppose one of our UK brethern could pick this one up and ship it over here...?

 

Not that I need another banjo, y'know. I've always thought that scalloped tension hoop was cool.

With the right balance of strings, bridge, vellum and tailpiece the Boom remains and the Tubbiness vanishes. Unlike some of the lower CE models, the Professional sounds good with steel strings.

Richard William Ineson said:

 

The 'Professional' hoops are generally pretty deep and impart a very booming, and to my mind 'tubby' sound to the instrument.

 

 

Sorry Marc, wrong end of the country for me!

Ian

 

OMG, it is a tiny country! One may walk from one end to the other in a day. Did Mr. Stephenson's railway finally go out of business? I thought that some guy named Brunnel had built a number of bridges so that one wouldn't have to swim the rivers...?

 

Of course, our esteemed Mr. Wade is likely closer. However, I suspect he has his finger hovering over the "bid" button at this very moment. ;-)

 

In reality, I have just purchased a new lawn-mower. If I add a banjo to this month's expenses, I fear Miz Diane would feed me to it. I'm not quite ready to be mulched, y'know.

 

===Marc

thereallyniceman said:

Sorry Marc, wrong end of the country for me!

Ian

 

Marc,

I am of an age where it is a long way down the road to the chemist's.  I would suggest that Mr Wade is equidistant, whatever that means.  I have a simple solution though. My CE Professional, with Weaver tension nuts and scalloped hoop is for sale... buy mine.

Perfect solution:  It saves me a long walk, and I can keep a secret :-)

 

Ian

LOL. With Miz Diane around, secrets are simply not a viable method for survival. One glance...well I would rather be suspended over young bamboo shoots...
No not me, it's miles away in the southern wastelands where they serve the beer so cold it has no taste......

OMG, another stereotype laid to waste. Cold beer in the UK? A travesty...!

 

I will admit that just last week Miz Diane took me to a local burrito joint and I had an ice-cold Corona. Perhaps I may be forgiven...the temps here have been 95F and up for the past few weeks (and 90% humidity).

David Wade said:

No not me, it's miles away in the southern wastelands where they serve the beer so cold it has no taste......

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