More photos of Eric Stefanelli's Ultimate Classic Banjo

Recently Luthier, and superb player, Eric Stefanelli posted on site about his NEW “Ultimate” Classic Style Banjo

 

Look here: THE NEW STEFANELLI CLASSIC STYLE BANJO

I have now received an email from Eric with some more photos of the superb banjo that he has designed and manufactured.

Please post your comments as I am sure the Eric would like to hear what you think about the instrument.

Here is a slightly edited copy of Eric's email:

Hi Ian !

It has taken me a long time to take new photos of my flush frets banjo, but here they are!

I hope that they will be interesting for the Classic Banjo chat group members.

I have been testing this new banjo for about one month, and have played it for many kinds of classic banjo music, it was made exclusively for classic banjo music.  It is very powerful and clear, my new tone ring system separates bass and treble notes clearly. It has a ventilated tone ring that stands on a vertical studs and balls.

This improved tone ring is not visible on the photos because it is not yet

protected by copyrights, I am thinking of applying for international patents.

The flush fret neck made as Van Eps flush frets banjo is lightly different

on the flush frets also the metal is different and very hard.

Please see attached files.

 

Best regards !

 

Eric.

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Thanks Eric. I have a question about the scalloped fingerboard.

When I fret notes on my banjo, often I am not very accurate at placing the finger directly behind the fret. If the finger lands at the centre of the scallop, as the scallop seems quite deep, will the string be stretched out of tune?

I have never played a scalloped fingerboard so don't know how they feel and act!

Looks good, definitely a racing model, should attract the women when you get one of these out. The flush fret fingerboard takes a bit of getting used to, but once experienced, you will want no other, all difficulties will be overcome, your improved technique will draw gasps of admiration, no one will ever kick sand in your face again.

Whoa! I guess I have to take extra-jobs (fishing crabs in Alaska, being a mime in a stock market) for a couple a months (I am optimistic!) in order to try one of these :)

Hi Ian and thanks to post my new  banjo photos on the site !

in  reply about your question of finger position on scalloped interval, firstly i can say it is very easy to play and comfortable, you always play in tune , it is not neccessary to play just behind the mark, you can put your finger  in the middle of the two marks, and you play always in tune mostly  up the neck !

Down the neck, the pressure of the finger on the string don't make a big distortion, it is not very audible, but in the middle part of the fingerboard and up the neck, you can adjust lightly the pressure to get a perfect note in tune with the others. At this point of fingerboard around the 10th fret, distortion and deepness of the scallop must be help you!...

It's like a violin player, the brain of the player is adjusting the note perfectly in tune. You can doing this by adjusting the pressure on the string with your finger, after two or three hours of testing your playing,  you are able to play right in tune. A little adaptation is neccessary.

The flush fret fonction is posed to make a mark, but not only, the metal of fret assure a great sustain just under the point where the string is in contact with the flush fret, and evoid the wear of the wood at this  contact area.

The scallop  help also to play in good and right temperament, i don't want to speak about unequal temperament, and equal temperament, diatonic scales for diatonic music, and chromatics scales, the number of comas by half tones, in diatonic music, and in the case of chromatic music, it's must be taking a long time  to explain it , but scalloped flush fret help deeply to resolve this technical music problems for all stringed instruments.

thereallyniceman said:

Thanks Eric. I have a question about the scalloped fingerboard.

When I fret notes on my banjo, often I am not very accurate at placing the finger directly behind the fret. If the finger lands at the centre of the scallop, as the scallop seems quite deep, will the string be stretched out of tune?

I have never played a scalloped fingerboard so don't know how they feel and act!



Richard William Ineson said:

Looks good, definitely a racing model, should attract the women when you get one of these out. The flush fret fingerboard takes a bit of getting used to, but once experienced, you will want no other, all difficulties will be overcome, your improved technique will draw gasps of admiration, no one will ever kick sand in your face again.

Hi Richard !

Thanks for this comment.

Yes , the playing is very comfortable after two or three hours training, (you need a little adaptation) sound also is more present.

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