A player who wishes to remain anonymous has sent me these pdfs which will be of interest to some here. I found it fascinating. Ossman's view of Joe Morley is very revealing!

Due to the upload limit, I've had to spread it out over a few posts. 

Scan_Doc0026.pdf

Scan_Doc0027.pdf

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Most curious!  I have read bits and pieces of the same interview in the earlier scans but this gives a more complete picture and also makes one wonder.  For instance what did Ossman mean about the fifth string being *technically* so taut? As opposed to what?  Vaguely taut?  Metaphorically taut?  Figuratively taut?  It does indicate however that he may have used a heavier gauge for his fifth string than for his first. Otherwise it would be no more taut than the first,   Then there is the matter of *harmonical" progressions. These days it is a common error to substitute the word "harmonics" for "harmonies".  Harmonics are overtones, upper partials.  But "harmonical" is a new one for me.   Then there is the claim (not apparently directly by Ossman himself) that he composed Cupid's Arrow. Should we doubt the usual Paul Eno attribution?  As for half of the women in the USA playing the banjo, the author caught that and doubted it for the rest of us. Great stuff, Rob! Thank you.

Rob....thank you VERY, VERY much! Ossman is my inspiration, and although I had read the English newspaper article previously, the Hobbies magazine articles are true treasures as well. I very much appreciate your willingness to share and upload these for all of us Ossman fanatics to read and enjoy. 

Now about some of the info. In one of the articles, it states that Vess wasn't recording as much anymore, perhaps because of his living in the midwest and touring publicly, and performing in vaudeville shows, AND/OR teaching. Does anybody know who some of his students may have been? 

Thanks again,

Dow

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