This iconic American March is currently my favourite out of all my recent march arrangements. I've taken it from an original piano arrangement in which is included Edward Berg's 'Red White And Blue'. I've trimmed it down it and have arrived at a pretty good approximation of the original score. Though I say so myself, it makes a great banjo march. Both marches could be played as solos in their own right. My apologies to Glen Miller!....The score and midi are in the library...Streve.

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I'm glad that you like the arrangement of the AP. Hunter had some good ideas and was quite a banjo player in his day. Sadly he has almost been forgotten by modern players but his house in Washington D.C. is still there on Kilburn Place, if my memory serves me right. His Grandfather was a General in the Civil War and the family lived in Bloomington.

Trapdoor2 said:

Cool. Thanks Richard!

The ABF Library catalog shows they have some MS by "Magee" for this piece also.

I thought I had it, but turns out I had two tunes of the same name, one by Sanders Papworth and one by Lansing (well, "American Banjo Patrol" by Lansing).

I've put this one in the queue. I'll transmorgrify it into a Banjo Solo (removing the piano part) and generate tab to go with the dots.

My pleasure, it is good to see the interest in these old banjo pieces, I can scan a few more pages out of this album if you want me to.

thereallyniceman said:

Thank you Richard! This is one great tune, and thank you for posting it.

I have added your score to the MUSIC LIBRARY for easy download.

Thanks to Marc too, who obviously has far too much time on his hands now that he has retired :-)

LOL. Retirement combined with self-isolation = time on the computer.

Here's the dots and an mp3 file. I'll generate tab on request. Frankly, Steve's version is way better than the PH arrangement.

American%20Patrol.pdf

American%20Patrol.mp3

Just FYI, the mp3 does not reflect the dynamics on the dots. The program I use supports them...but not if they're supposed to be different in the repeated sections, etc. A "Patrol" should be played starting softly (pp or whatever) and then rise in volume to the trio. The repeat should gradually decline (dim.) in volume to the CODA's ppp. This one is marked as such...but Glen Miller didn't play it as a "patrol" anyway. FWIW, I think the best example of a proper patrol is Wm. Ball's recording of "Patrol Eccentrique".

Thanks for dealing with the PH arrangement of American Patrol. i agree that Steve's version sounds better but I suppose that PH would have added a few embellishments to his performance of the tune. 

Trapdoor2 said:

LOL. Retirement combined with self-isolation = time on the computer.

Here's the dots and an mp3 file. I'll generate tab on request. Frankly, Steve's version is way better than the PH arrangement.

American%20Patrol.pdf

American%20Patrol.mp3

Just FYI, the mp3 does not reflect the dynamics on the dots. The program I use supports them...but not if they're supposed to be different in the repeated sections, etc. A "Patrol" should be played starting softly (pp or whatever) and then rise in volume to the trio. The repeat should gradually decline (dim.) in volume to the CODA's ppp. This one is marked as such...but Glen Miller didn't play it as a "patrol" anyway. FWIW, I think the best example of a proper patrol is Wm. Ball's recording of "Patrol Eccentrique".

I find that the banjo over piano in a lot of English music is merely a guide for the piano player.  They can be stripped down compared to the "banjo" part.  I am not saying that is the case here, just that I have noticed that when looking over complete scores (1st, 2nd, and piano) together.

Philosophically, one would expect a duo arrangement, when broken up into parts, to be rather spare arrangements separately. However, it is much more expeditious to claim the same part can be used as a solo...which one finds commonly. If I were a publisher, I would think I was getting a "twofer" when I could sell them separately without changing either arrangement.

And, of course, even a hack banjoist (like myself) will alter their actual playing to suit themselves. I felt the mp3 needed to take a breath at the D.C., so I added one (') just to make it sound right in the playback. I forgot to remove it for the pdf print. I imagine a fermata would also suffice.

I've never noticed in scores either (usually when doing this, I don't have a separate 'solo' part anyway). However, I do have a number of these where I have the solo and the piano part with banjo guide. I've never really taken the time to compare. I'll try to remember! 

Joel Hooks said:

I find that the banjo over piano in a lot of English music is merely a guide for the piano player.  They can be stripped down compared to the "banjo" part.  I am not saying that is the case here, just that I have noticed that when looking over complete scores (1st, 2nd, and piano) together.

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