Some time ago site member Rev. Anthony Peabody and I discussed the possibility of creating a special section on the website to enable members and site visitors to share the work that he has been doing in creating audio files from early Joe Morley scores.

 

The Cammeyer Music and Manufacturing Company, a partnership between Alfred Cammeyer and Clifford Essex, published many of these scores 1893 to c1900. Most of these early pieces were arranged for a duet of banjos and some seem not to have had piano accompaniments available. They were published in the Cammeyer series of “Banjo Albums”, but I believe that individual tunes and parts could be ordered from the publishers.

Anthony is one of the very few Bass banjo players around and has added a bass banjo part to these audio tracks. This addition really brings the scores to life!  The audio recordings were produced midi format and the sampling of “General Midi” banjo is diabolical, sounding like a Dalek on helium, so I have re-edited them, as best as I can, using guitar and piano GM files.

 

Richard Ineson has done extensive research into the dating of Morley’s compositions and his work can be found on the Joe Morley website:    Joe Morley website

 

Most of the works are un-dated so the order of listing of the scores are in “approximate” date of publishing only and may be re-ordered if necessary over time.

 

I have been working on creating a database and page to allow visitors to download the Morley scores and play the audio file while they view the sheet music score!

I hope that you are inspired to have a go at playing some of these long lost gems!

VIEW THE SCORES AND PLAY THE MUSIC

 

I intend to expand this project to include as many of Morley’s later compositions as I can... but it may take a while, as there are approximately 250!

 

ENJOY

 

Views: 715

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Thank you, Ian and Anthony.  Here's what I found:  Left clicking on "download" allows the thesis to be read on the website. How long will it remain there? But lRight clicking and selecting "download" or "download as"  actually downloads the file to one's own computer or device. 

I've been slowly reading through it and I will say I am impressed.  I think this is just what we needed to become experts on Morley.

One point that I do not like is the use of "classical" when referring to "classic banjo."  I know it is a small thing but calling what we do "classical banjo" will attract the wrong crowd.

Not to mention the disappointment when someone comes looking for classical music.

Then there are the people who would hear "classical banjo" and not look any further- thus scaring them away (I know I would have had no interest in it had I thought it was "classical").

I just scanned the thesis...amazing amount of work, dedication, etc. Well done Anthony!

As an American, I found the grammar and spelling conventions interesting. We typically capitalize genre like "Bluegrass" and it is one word (to differentiate it from "blue grass or bluegrass", which is something upon which one would use a lawnmower).

"Classic" vs "Classical": while I'm sure we're all on board with "classic" here, I think it is too generic and without a shred of descriptive nuance. These days people speak of "Classic Bluegrass Banjo" (Scruggs, etc.) and "Classic Melodic Banjo" (Keith, Trishka, etc.) and probably Classic Punk Banjo. Unfortunately "Classic Banjo" simply has no meaning for anyone but us...and we're left explaining over and over and over, ad nauseum.

We had some friends over a week ago (they forced me to play) and I used, "Belle Époque Banjo"...the wife immediately got it. "Victorian Era Banjo" also seems to make sense to non-music people.

 

Joel Hooks said:

I've been slowly reading through it and I will say I am impressed.  I think this is just what we needed to become experts on Morley.

One point that I do not like is the use of "classical" when referring to "classic banjo."  I know it is a small thing but calling what we do "classical banjo" will attract the wrong crowd.

Not to mention the disappointment when someone comes looking for classical music.

Then there are the people who would hear "classical banjo" and not look any further- thus scaring them away (I know I would have had no interest in it had I thought it was "classical").

Anthony,  on page 13 you say that the English 7 string banjo had at least one of its strings doubled. I assume that means that 2 of its 7 strings were tuned to the same pitch. Which strings were those please?  Were they consecutive strings?  And if so, were the notches for these strings on the bridge and nut placed close together as a double course ?

On page 37 there is a newspaper clipping containing a sentence which in a subordinate clause causally mentions that the Czar of Russia plays the 5 string banjo!  What??  Can that be true?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2018   Created by thereallyniceman.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service