Rev Anthony and I are still working on producing audio tracks for all (or nearly all) of Joe Morley's compositions and arrangements.

So far so good until we get to Joe's "Felicita".... BUT here we are stumped. I have checked my banjos and I can't find a single one!

So, does anyone know what on earth this instruction on the CE Published score means?

      ...and now on again !!!!!

???????????

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I would guess that it is Britspeak for a 'soft pedal' mute. "off" appears to be associated with the 'mf' dynamic and "on" with 'pp'. That would be consistent with a mechanical mute like the B&D 'soft pedal'.

For what we're doing, I'd just ignore it.

BTW, "Expression Stop" is a carryover from the old reed organ. This stop altered the airflow to the pedals to allow more control over their dynamic range.

I'm not sure I understand the question. Are you asking what an "expression stop" is, and how one puts it on one's banjo and takes it off again?  Seeing as the score shows pp when on and mf when on, could the "expression stop" be a banjo mute that is placed on the bridge?

whoops, I wrote my reply half an hour ago and forgot to send it. Looks like Marc had the same idea.

Jody Stecher said:

I'm not sure I understand the question. Are you asking what an "expression stop" is, and how one puts it on one's banjo and takes it off again?  Seeing as the score shows pp when on and mf when on, could the "expression stop" be a banjo mute that is placed on the bridge?

Well, I knew about the B&D knee mute and the Farland, finger slicing knee mute assembly (eh Jody?)

but have never heard of the "Essex Expression Stop"... then all of a sudden one appears!!!

Thanks to Richard Ineson for sending the cutting.  I knew that we could rely on you Richard!!

Also as Christmas is approaching what could be better for the banjoist in your life than a "Ne-Klip" music stand ???

It looks like the British plagiarism extended past just sheet music!

Except for the absurd knee sheet music stand that I've not seen before (of which I now have to find and or build one-- thanks again Ian) everything on that page is a direct knockoff of an American design.  

The string pouch is from the 1890s (and was even given away by SSS with a large order of strings).  The fingerrest is a perfect copy of the Hartnett tone bar.  Speaking of Hartnett, the "expression stop" is the spittin' image of my Hartnett "soft pedal." 

Do I need to comment on the S.X. wrist rest?

That is a fun ad copy!

I demand all this expression stop. Right now! ;-)

I have a Paramount soft pedal, pretty neat little device but it requires a hole drilled thru the rim, not something I want to do just yet to my original Paramount banjos (though it adds value). You have to pull or push a knob that exits the rim near the heel of the banjo (bass side). Not 'automatic' like the S.X. or Hartnett (or B&D).

Now Ian will have to find an original SX. Nice addition to any collection!

Hey Ian, what year is this ad from?


thereallyniceman said:

Well, I knew about the B&D knee mute and the Farland, finger slicing knee mute assembly (eh Jody?)

but have never heard of the "Essex Expression Stop"... then all of a sudden one appears!!!

Thanks to Richard Ineson for sending the cutting.  I knew that we could rely on you Richard!!

Also as Christmas is approaching what could be better for the banjoist in your life than a "Ne-Klip" music stand ???

I know this may be a little late but I was putting together Tim Mainland's arrangement of Sevilla for 5 banjos when I came across this notation that doesn't play at all. It is for the Piccolo Banjo part and consists of 3 slashes. Could it be a tremolo with a slide to the next note? Any help would be appreciated.

Attachments:

You have it right, Hal. The slashes indicate that the tremolo is to be played consistently between the two notes (in that you start your trem on the first pair and continue thru the following note). Whether you get there via a slide, glissando or something else is up to the player (or the concert master).

I would suspect it would sound best as a gliss. Specifically, one would glissando on the string which provided the most distance (while staying on the same string).

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